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Policy 6-404: Undergraduate Admission

  1. Purpose and Scope
    1. This Policy sets forth the criteria, standards and procedures that will be used for admission of all undergraduate students to the University, as established by the Academic Senate and Board of Trustees consistent with the University's mission and role within the Utah State System of Higher Education, and in compliance with requirements established by the State Board of Regents. (See Regents Policy R461: Admissions, Access and Articulation.) This Policy is intended to govern only admission of undergraduate students. See Policy 6-200 regarding admission of graduate students.
  2. Definitions
    1. Academic Non-Performance - A student's failure to maintain the required minimum cumulative grade point average necessary to remain in good academic standing (See Policy 6-100-III-K).
    2. Academic Renewal - A procedure which allows a student to request that his/her academic record be reviewed for the purpose of discounting, University of Utah courses with a D+ or lower grade on the student's academic record. (See Policy 6-100-III-M)
    3. Accredited Institution - A post-secondary educational institution that has been determined, by a University-approved accrediting body, to have maintained appropriate academic standards.
    4. Asylee - An applicant granted Asylum status by the United States (“U.S.”) Citizenship and Immigration Services.
    5. Conditional Admission - The admission of an applicant who meets all of the admission requirements except for either (i) the successful completion of the high school core coursework requirements (applicants with less than 30 transferrable semester credits, see Section III-D-3), or (ii) the English language proficiency requirement (international applicants, see Section III-D-4), or (iii) specified conditions imposed for readmission (see Section III-F).
    6. Degree-Seeking Student - A matriculated student seeking a degree.
    7. Dismissal - Revocation of student status at a college or university due to academic non-performance (i.e., academic dismissal); or academic, behavioral, or professional misconduct (i.e., misconduct dismissal); or other reasons.
    8. Domestic Applicant - An applicant seeking admission who is a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident.
    9. Freshman Applicant - A high school graduate, or an applicant expected to graduate from high school before entering the University, who has not matriculated at another accredited institution.
    10. Good Academic Standing - A student is considered to be in good academic standing if he/she maintains the minimum required cumulative GPA at a college or university (i.e., not in a status of academic non-performance as defined herein) and has not been placed on warning or probation, suspended or dismissed for academic, behavioral, or professional misconduct, or other reasons. For students enrolled at the University, these matters are governed by Policies 6-100-III-K and 6-400.
    11. High School - U.S. or non-U.S. secondary school, grades nine through twelve, or equivalent.
    12. High School University Program - Dual enrollment program for Utah high school students, sophomores through seniors, who want to take college-level courses at the University.
    13. Home School - High school curriculum taught in a home environment.
    14. International Applicant - An applicant seeking admission who has, or must request, a visa to study in the U.S.
    15. Matriculated Student - A student who has been formally admitted to the University, has confirmed his/her intent to enroll, and is eligible to register for courses as a degree-seeking student.
    16. Non-Matriculated Student - A student granted permission to enroll as a non-degree-seeking student and register for courses.
    17. Non-Traditional Applicant - A high school graduate, who has been out of high school for seven or more years, and who has not attended an accredited institution after high school.
    18. Permanent Resident - An applicant granted Permanent Resident status by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
    19. Probation - Status of a student, who is not in good standing due to academic non-performance (i.e., academic probation); academic, behavioral, or professional misconduct (i.e., misconduct probation); or other reasons, but is allowed to enroll in college or university courses during a probationary period.
    20. Readmission Applicant - Student previously enrolled at the University who is not currently eligible to register for courses and is seeking readmission pursuant to this Policy.
    21. Recognized non-U.S. University - An institution of higher education that is accredited by an appropriate official education body (e.g., ministry of education) in the country in which the institution is located.
    22. Refugee - An applicant for admission who has been granted Refugee status by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
    23. Secondary School Year - The equivalent of two semesters, three trimesters, or four quarters for one academic year at a high school
    24. Suspension - Status of a student who for a period of time is not allowed to enroll in college or university courses due to academic non-performance (i.e. academic suspension); or academic, behavioral, or professional misconduct (i.e., misconduct suspension); or other reasons.
    25. Transfer Applicant - An applicant for admission who has not previously matriculated and enrolled at the University but has completed and/or attempted at least one transferable course from an accredited institution after graduating from high school (or the equivalent).
    26. Transferable Academic Credit - All credit earned at another college or university that is approved for transfer to the University.
    27. . Underage Applicant - An applicant for admission who has completed the high school core coursework requirements (or equivalent) and wants to enroll in University courses prior to reaching the age of 18.
    28. Unit of Credit - For high school core coursework requirements, credit earned at a high school, equivalent to a “Carnegie Unit” of measurement developed by the Carnegie Foundation, which is defined as 120 hours of class or contact time with an instructor over the course of a year at a high school. This translates to one unit for an entire high school year.
    29. Academic Advising Center - An academic administration unit of the University within the Office of Undergraduate Studies, which is established by Policy 6-101-III-B, and which among other responsibilities is charged with advising students in transitional situations and administering processes for various academic policies. (See Sections III-F and III-J below, and Policy 6-100-III subsections G, K, and M).
    30. Un-weighted Cumulative High School GPA - A high school GPA as reported by the school and calculated without extra points awarded for higher-level course work.
  3. Policy
    1. Credits and Admissions Committee
      1. The Credits and Admissions Committee is hereby established as a University committee. The membership and leadership shall be as follows: There shall be 11 voting members (nine faculty members and two student representatives) and four ex officio, non-voting, permanent members.
        1. Faculty. The nine faculty members shall be appointed by the Senate Personnel and Elections Committee. No more than two faculty members may serve from the same academic college. Each faculty member shall serve a term of three years. The faculty membership of the Committee shall be staggered so that three faculty members will be appointed each year. Faculty may serve multiple consecutive terms.
        2. Students. Two student representatives will be appointed by the Associated Students of the University of Utah Academic Affairs Director. Students will have annual terms of service, but may serve multiple consecutive terms.
        3. Ex officios. There shall be at least four ex officio, non-voting, permanent members, appointed to the Committee by the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, upon consultation with the Committee chairperson. These may include the Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management, the Director of Admissions, a representative from Academic Advising Center, and a representative from the Office of Equity and Diversity, or equivalent positions, and such other persons as deemed necessary by the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.
        4. The President of the Academic Senate shall annually nominate one of the nine faculty members on the Committee to serve as the chairperson, subject to approval by the President of the University.
        5. The Committee will report directly to the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.
      2. The functions of the Committee include those described in this Policy and any University Rules associated with this Policy. In addition, the Committee has the functions assigned to it under other Policies, including the authority to determine the value of course credit and academic standing which will be uniformly applicable for all entering undergraduate students, including acceptance of transfer credits (as more fully described in Policy 6-100-III-C-12), and the granting of credit through special examinations (as more fully described in Policy 6-101-III-J). No other committee, member of the faculty, or other representative of the University is authorized to make commitments to students concerning admission or credit.
      3. Development of Specific Standards for Admission Criteria.It is the responsibility of the Committee to develop specific standards for implementation of each of the following admissions criteria. The Committee shall develop these specific standards based on appropriate information, including information it shall obtain by conducting regular and periodic research and review of student success metrics provided by the Office of Budget and Institutional Analysis. The standards shall be developed in consultation with appropriate administrative offices, and shall be presented to the Academic Senate for its information and recommendations. The criteria for which such standards are to be so developed are:
        1. Minimum cumulative GPA requirements for each of the following categories of admission applicants: non-traditional applicants (Section III-D), transfer applicants (Section III-E), applicants seeking an additional bachelor's degree (Section III-G), and High School University Program applicants (Section III-M);
        2. Minimum ACT or SAT test score requirements for High School University Program applicants (Section III-M);
        3. Acceptable English language proficiency tests to be used for admissions purposes, or specified exceptions to be accepted by the University in lieu of such a proficiency test; and
        4. Minimum English language proficiency test score requirements for the following categories of applicants: international undergraduate applicants (Section III-D-4); permanent resident, refugee, and asylee undergraduate applicants (Section III-D-9); applicants seeking an additional bachelors degree who are international applicants, permanent residents, refugees or asylees (Section III-G-5); and international students applying for the High School University Program (Section III-M).
      4. It is the responsibility of the Committee and the Office of Admissions to conduct regular and periodic research and review of the admissions criteria and standards to ensure that no student is denied admission because of policies, procedures or criteria that may discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, status as a disabled individual, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, or protected veteran's status.
      5. It is the responsibility of the Committee to conduct regular and periodic review of the undergraduate admission procedures established by the Office of Admissions to ensure that they are consistent with this Policy and all other pertinent University Regulations.
      6. The Committee is an appropriate forum for reviewing any proposed changes to this Policy and any other University Regulation, process or practice regarding admission of undergraduate students to the University.
      7. The Committee shall have such additional responsibilities as may be assigned by the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Executive Committee of the Academic Senate may recommend to the Senior Vice President particular assignments of responsibility for the Committee.
      8. The Committee shall submit to the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs a full report of its activities at least annually, and a summary of such report suitable for public distribution shall be presented at least annually for the information of the Academic Senate.
    2. General Process, Criteria, and Standards for Admission to the University
      1. The provisions of this Section III-B apply for all applicants for any of the categories of admission described within this Policy, unless otherwise specified in Sections III-D to III-M below for a particular admission category.
        1. All prospective undergraduate students must submit a completed undergraduate admission application and pay applicable fees through the Office of Admissions by the established deadline. The application form contents, fees, and application deadline for each academic year shall be established by the Office of Admissions and approved by the Credits and Admissions Committee.
        2. All documents provided by an applicant as part of the application process for admission of any type become University property. The University will not return any such documents to the applicant or provide copies for any non-University use.
      2. Individualized Holistic Evaluation.Admissions decisions will be based on holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications. Individualized holistic reviews of application materials will be conducted by the Office of Admissions. The holistic review process will focus on these factors that the University has determined (1) have a bearing on success at the University and/or (2) make valuable contributions to the University community:
        1. Excellence in academic achievement, intellectual pursuits, and creative endeavors;
        2. An understanding of and respect for historically underrepresented populations;
        3. Significant commitment to service to others through public service activities, community engagement, leadership, or familial responsibilities;
        4. Integrity, personal maturity, motivation, and resiliency; and
        5. The ability to contribute to and benefit from a culturally diverse learning community.
      3. The University reserves the right to deny admission for any lawful reason. Circumstances that may lead to the denial of admission include, but are not limited to:
        1. Failing to meet the academic requirements for admission;
        2. Providing false and/or incomplete information in the application process;
        3. Failing to identify all previous academic institutions attended;
        4. Failing to inform the Office of Admissions of any changes to the academic and/or conduct record from prior institutions attended;
        5. Evidence of egregious academic, behavioral, or professional misconduct at academic institutions attended (equivalent to misconduct under the University's Student Code, Policy 6-400);
        6. Suspension or dismissal from a college or university for disciplinary reasons; or
        7. Pending criminal charge or conviction of a violation of any local, state, or federal law, other than a minor traffic violation, when the University determines such a record of criminal activity presents an unacceptable risk of harm to the University or other members of the University community.
      4. Students admitted to the University based upon false or incomplete information in the application process may be subject to disciplinary action under the Student Code, Policy 6-400, including admission revocation, dismissal, or revocation of course credits, grades, and degrees.
      5. All applicants who are initially denied admission to the University by decision of the Office of Admissions have the right to appeal that decision to the Credits and Admissions Committee, which has the final authority to admit or deny the applicants under condition or exception.
      6. Applicants who are admitted must subsequently enroll in University courses within the required time period, which shall be established by the Office of Admissions and approved by the Credits and Admissions Committee. An admitted student who fails to so timely register (without having an approved deferment per Section III-H) will become ineligible to register for subsequent semesters, and to regain eligibility will be required to re-apply for admission.
    3. Admission on Exception Basis
      1. Applicants initially denied admission through the holistic review process described in Section III-B-3 may appeal the decision to the Office of Admissions on an exception basis under the provisions of Utah Board of Regents Policy R461-4.6.
      2. Applicants wishing to appeal the initial denial of admission by the Office of Admissions based on this Section III-C must provide additional documentation to the Office of Admissions, by the established deadline, to demonstrate:
        1. Why common indicators of predicted academic success may not be valid indicators of their potential success at the University; or
        2. How their special talents or diversity will enhance the institution's character.
      3. No more than five percent of any admitted class may be admitted on an exception basis under the terms of this Section III-C. (See Regents Policy R461-4.6)
      4. Students admitted on an exception basis will be matched, to the extent possible, with appropriate support mechanisms at the University to increase their likelihood of success.
    4. Admission for Freshman Applicants
      1. Admissions decisions for all freshman applicant categories in this Section III-D will be based on the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, as well as any additional requirements specified below for a particular category.
      2. Freshman applicants must submit the following required credentials materials:
        1. An official copy of the high school transcript or certification of courses completed, sent directly from the school of record;
        2. ACT or SAT scores; and c. Other credentials materials determined by the Credits and Admissions Committee to be uniformly appropriate for freshman applicants.
      3. Domestic Applicants
        1. In addition to the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, the following requirements apply for this category of admission applicants.
        2. Domestic applicants (as defined in Section II above) must demonstrate successful completion of the following units of credit in core coursework subjects at a regionally-accredited high school (See Regents Policy R461-4.3.1):
          1. English - 4 units of credit emphasizing composition and literature;
          2. Mathematics - 2 units of credit beyond elementary algebra chosen from the following list: geometry, intermediate algebra, trigonometry, advanced algebra, or calculus;
          3. Biological or Human Biological and/or Physical Science - 3 units of credit, two of which are required to be taken from the following: chemistry, physics, and biology or human biology (one of the sciences must include a laboratory experience);
          4. History - 1 unit of credit of American history and government (processes and structure of democratic governance);
          5. Foreign Language - 2 units of credit of the same foreign language taken during grades seven through twelve; and
          6. Additional Units Required - 4 units of credit to be chosen from at least two of the following: English, fine arts, foreign language, history, laboratory science, mathematics beyond intermediate algebra, and social science.
        3. Domestic applicants who meet all admissions requirements except the high school core coursework requirements may be conditionally admitted to the University under the provisions of Regents Policy R461-4.3.2. Conditionally-admitted students must satisfy high school core coursework requirements before completing 30 University of Utah credits. Failure to satisfy this requirement in the permitted time frame may result in a registration hold.
      4. International Applicants
        1. In addition to the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, the following requirements apply for this category of admission applicants.
        2. International applicants (as defined in Section II above) graduating from high schools outside the U.S. must complete all requirements for graduation with satisfactory grades and must have received a diploma or certificate of graduation. In addition, they must be eligible for admission to a recognized non-U.S. university in the country in which they graduated.
        3. International applicants graduating from a U.S. high school must meet the same admission requirements as domestic applicants detailed in Section III-D-3.
        4. All international applicants must document their English language proficiency with the requisite score on an approved test or meet one of the exceptions approved by the Credits and Admissions Committee. The approved English language proficiency tests and the minimum required test scores are developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above).
        5. International applicants who do not document their English language proficiency in the manner described above may be conditionally admitted to the University provided they satisfy all other admissions requirements. Conditionally-admitted international students will have no more than one calendar year to demonstrate English language proficiency. Such conditional admission will include a statement of the nature of the deficiency and the manner in which it will be remediated. Failure to satisfy this requirement in the permitted time frame may result in a registration hold.
      5. Non-Traditional Applicants
        1. In addition to the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, the following requirements apply for this category of admission applicants.
        2. Applicants who graduated from high school seven or more years prior to the term of admission, and have not previously attended an accredited institution, may apply for non-traditional admission.
        3. Non-traditional applicants will be considered for admission on the following criteria:
          1. Approved high school core coursework detailed in Section III-D-3; and
          2. Meeting the minimum un-weighted cumulative high school GPA developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above).
        4. Non-traditional applicants must:
          1. Submit a completed undergraduate admission application and pay applicable fees to the Office of Admissions by the established deadline (See Section III-B-2); and
          2. Submit an official high school transcript listing courses completed and graduation date.
        5. An applicant who has not satisfied the high school core coursework or GPA requirements may submit, or may be required to submit, additional documentation concerning their preparedness for University coursework such as ACT or SAT test scores, or other evidence of academic potential.
        6. If approved for admission, non-traditional applicants will be classified as matriculated students.
      6. Underage Applicants
        1. In addition to the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, the following requirements apply for this category of admission applicants.
        2. Underage applicants (as defined in Section II above) must meet the same admission requirements as domestic applicants detailed in Section III-D-3.
        3. Underage applicants may be required to submit additional credentials materials, as determined by the Office of Admissions.
        4. Applicants wishing to enroll in University courses prior to reaching the age of 16 must receive individual approval by the Credits and Admissions Committee.
      7. Applicants without a Diploma from an Accredited High School
        1. In addition to the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, the following requirements apply for this category of admission applicants.
        2. This category includes graduates of a non-accredited high school, home school, or students without a high school diploma.
        3. Applicants may be required to submit additional credentials materials, as determined by the Office of Admissions.
      8. Domestic Applicants Attending a Non-U.S. High School
        1. In addition to the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, the following requirements apply for this category of admission applicants.
        2. Applicants must complete all requirements for high-school graduation with satisfactory grades and must have received the diploma or certificate of graduation.
        3. Applicants must be eligible for admission to a recognized non-U.S. university in the country in which they graduated.
        4. Applicants may be required to submit additional materials, as determined by the Office of Admissions.
      9. Permanent Residents, Refugees and Asylees:
        1. In addition to the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, the following requirements apply for this category of admission applicants.
        2. Applicants with the immigration status of permanent resident, refugee, or asylum (as defined in Section II above), who have completed three or more years at an accredited U.S. high school, must meet the same freshman admission requirements as domestic students detailed in Section III-D-3.
        3. All permanent residents, refugees, and asylees must document their English language proficiency with the requisite score on an approved test or meet one of the exceptions approved by the Credits and Admissions Committee. The approved English language proficiency tests and the minimum required test scores are developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above).
      10. Admission for Transfer Applicants
        1. Admissions decisions for all transfer applicants will be based on the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, as well as the following additional requirements.
        2. Transfer applicants with at least 30 completed credit hours of transferable academic credit from an accredited institution (as defined in Section II above) after high school graduation must:
          1. Submit a completed undergraduate admission application and applicable fee to the Office of Admissions by the established deadline (See Section III-B-2);
          2. Submit official transcripts from all accredited institutions attended, to be considered for transferable academic credit; and c. Meet the minimum required cumulative transferable GPA developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above).
        3. Transfer applicants with fewer than 30 hours of completed transferable academic credit from an accredited institution after high school graduation must:
          1. Submit official transcripts from all accredited institutions attended, to be considered for transferable academic credit; and
          2. Meet the other admissions requirements for freshman applicants detailed in Section III-D.
        4. All international, permanent resident, refugee, and asylee (as defined in Section II) transfer applicants must document their English language proficiency with the requisite score on an approved test or meet one of the exceptions approved by the Credits and Admissions Committee. The approved English language proficiency tests and the minimum required test scores are developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above).
    5. Readmission of Applicants Previously Enrolled and No Longer Eligible to Register.
      1. Circumstances for Cases of Readmission. In general, readmission under this Section III-F, rather than the other types of admission described in this Policy, is the appropriate process for admitting to the University an individual who was previously admitted and enrolled as a degree-seeking student at the University and who, without having gone on to complete the requirements for an undergraduate degree, either voluntarily left the University, or was declared by the University to be ineligible to continue registering for courses. More specifically, cases for readmission include any individual currently seeking to be returned to a status of eligibility to register for courses who previously (i) chose to withdraw from the University, (ii) chose to not register for University courses for a period of three consecutive semesters without having sought and been granted an approved leave of absence (unauthorized leave), (iii) was granted a leave of absence but failed to comply with the terms of the leave (including returning on the specified date), (iv) was prohibited by the University from registering for courses for three or more semesters as a result of being suspended or dismissed for academic non-performance or misconduct, or (v) as an international student failed to maintain lawful student visa status.
      2. Procedures, Criteria and Standards for Readmission.
        1. Provisions for all categories of readmission applicants.
          1. All applicants for readmission must submit a completed undergraduate admission applicant form and pay applicable fees through the Office of Admissions by the established deadline (See Section III-B-2 above).
          2. Readmissions decisions for all applicants will be based on the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications which is described in Section III-B-3 above, as well as any additional requirements specified below for a particular category.
          3. The Office of Admissions may impose specified conditions for readmission of any applicant based on specific concerns identified in the holistic evaluation process. The University may revoke the admission of any student who does not subsequently comply with such specified conditions.
          4. As provided in Section III-B-6 above, an applicant for readmission who is initially denied readmission by decision of the Office of Admissions has the right to appeal that decision to the Credits and Admissions Committee, which has the final authority to readmit or deny the applicants under condition or exception.
        2. Applicants who have attended another institution.
          1. Any applicant for readmission who has attended and obtained course credits from any other accredited institution at any time subsequent to the initial admission to the University must submit, as part of the readmission application, official transcripts from all such institutions attended.
          2. Ordinarily, the applicant must be in good academic standing (as defined in Section II) at all such institutions. However, in conducting the holistic evaluation the Office of Admissions will consider extenuating circumstances relevant to an applicant's lack of such good standing and may, in appropriate cases, grant readmission.
        3. Additional requirements for readmission in circumstances of prior academic non-performance at the University. This subsection applies for any applicant for readmission whose most recent previous status at the University was not in good academic standing, due to academic non-performance (as defined in Section II), as governed by Policy 6-100-III-K (Academic Standards for Undergraduates), and administered through Academic Advising Center.
          1. If the applicant's status was on academic warning or probation, the Office of Admissions will consider that status and underlying circumstances as part of the holistic evaluation for readmission, and may consult with Academic Advising Center about the circumstances. If readmitted, the applicant will be returned to that same previous status of warning or probation and the applicable requirements under Policy 6-100-III-K, under supervision of Academic Advising Center (as well as being subject to any additional conditions imposed in the readmission decision).
          2. If the applicant's previous status was academic suspension or dismissal, there will be a two-step process for readmission. First, in accord with Policy 6-100-III-K, the applicant must request through Academic Advising Center a case review and recommendation regarding readmission. Under the terms of that Policy, the case review through Academic Advising Center will vary depending on the particular most recent academic status (suspension or dismissal) and circumstances leading to that status. As more fully described in that Policy, if the applicant's most recent status was academic dismissal, readmission cannot be granted unless in its case review Academic Advising Center determines the applicant is eligible for the process of Academic Renewal, thereby raising the applicant's cumulative University GPA by discounting certain course grades (Policy 6-100-III-K-6). If the recommendation through Academic Advising Center is in favor of readmission in any case, the recommendation may include that the Office of Admissions consider imposing certain specified conditions for readmission. Second, if the recommendation through Academic Advising Center is in favor of readmission, the applicant may then proceed to apply for readmission under Section III-F of this Policy, and the recommendation issued through Academic Advising Center (including any recommended conditions) will be considered by the Office of Admissions as part of the holistic evaluation of qualifications.
          3. If readmitted, the student must subsequently maintain the minimum grade point average (as specified in Policy 6-100-III-K-6), as well as complying with any other conditions specified for readmission under Section III-F of this Policy.
        4. Additional requirements for readmission in circumstances of prior misconduct. This subsection applies for any applicant for readmission whose most recent previous status at the University was not in good academic standing, due to academic, behavioral, or professional misconduct (as defined in Section II) as governed by Policy 6-400 (Student Code), and administered through the Office of the Dean of Students (with involvement of other deans as provided in 6-400).
          1. If the applicant's status was probation for misconduct, the Office of Admissions will consider that status and underlying circumstances as part of the holistic evaluation for readmission, and may consult with the Office of the Dean about the circumstances. If readmitted, the applicant, as appropriate for the circumstances, will be returned to that same previous status of probation and the applicable requirements under Policy 6-400, as administered through the Office of the Dean (as well as being subject to any additional conditions imposed in the readmission decision).
          2. If the applicant's previous status was suspension for misconduct, there will be a two-step process for readmission. First, in accord with the principles of Policy 6-400, the applicant must request, through the Office of the Dean of Students, a Dean's case review and recommendation regarding readmission. If the recommendation through the Office of the Dean is in favor of readmission in any case, the recommendation may include that the Office of Admissions consider imposing certain specified conditions for readmission. Second, if the recommendation through the Office of the Dean is in favor of readmission, the applicant may then proceed to apply for readmission under Section III-F of this Policy, and the recommendation issued through the Office of the Dean (including any recommended conditions) will be considered by the Office of Admissions as part of the holistic evaluation of qualifications.
          3. For any applicant whose most recent previous status at the University was not in good academic standing due to both misconduct (suspension per Policy 6-400), and academic non-performance (suspension or dismissal per Policy 6-100), as a first step such an applicant must request a case review and recommendation through both Academic Advising Center (per Section III-F-2-c), and the Office of the Dean of Students (per Section III-F-2-d), and both will be considered in the second step in any application for readmission.
          4. A student whose most recent previous status is having been dismissed from the University for any form of misconduct, as provided in Policy 6-400 cannot be readmitted to the University, and the Office of Admissions will not consider an application from such student. (Policy 6-400-Sec. III-H, Sec. V-F, Sec. VI-F).
        5. Special provisions for readmission of international students. International students (as defined in Section II) must abide by the appropriate federal regulations to maintain their student visa status. If an international student, by failing to maintain current registration at the University, fails to maintain lawful student visa status, that student becomes ineligible to register for University courses in subsequent semesters. Such a student who wishes to regain eligibility to register for courses must apply for readmission under this Section III-F.
    6. Admission or Readmission of Applicants Seeking an Additional Bachelor's Degree
      1. Admissions decisions regarding the readmission of a student or the admission of an applicant seeking an additional bachelor's degree will be based on the individualized holistic evaluation of applicants' qualifications as described in Section III-B-3 above, as well as the following additional requirements.
      2. Applicants who have completed a 4-year bachelor's degree or equivalent, either at the University, or at another institution, may seek readmission or initial admission, respectively, to the University for purposes of obtaining an additional bachelor's degree.
      3. Applicants who have completed a bachelor's degree at the University and who have not attended another accredited institution since their graduation must submit an undergraduate admission application and pay applicable fees by the established deadline. (See Section III-B-2.)
      4. Applicants who have completed their bachelor's degree at another accredited institution or a recognized non-U.S. university (as defined in Section II above) must:
        1. Submit a completed undergraduate admission application and pay applicable fees by the established deadline. (See Section III-B-2);
        2. Submit transcripts from all accredited institutions or recognized non-U.S. universities attended;
        3. Provide verification of a conferred bachelor's degree; and
        4. Meet the minimum required cumulative GPA developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above).
      5. All international applicants, permanent residents, refugees, and asylees (as defined in Section II above) must document their English language proficiency with the requisite score on an approved test or by meeting one of the exceptions approved by the Credits and Admissions Committee. The approved English language proficiency tests and the minimum required test scores are developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above).
    7. Admission Deferment
      1. Newly accepted freshman, transfer, or readmitted degree-seeking undergraduate students (who have not yet reached a point of eligibility to apply for a leave of absence per Section III-I) who wish to defer their start date to a later semester may apply for an admission deferment.
      2. Applicants for deferment must submit an approved deferment application to the Office of Admissions and pay the established enrollment deposit by the appropriate deadline. The application deadline and enrollment deposit shall be established by the Office of Admissions and approved by the Credits and Admissions Committee.
      3. Requests to defer an offer of admission will be reviewed by the Office of Admissions on a case-by-case basis, and may be granted for reasons including, but not limited to illness (personal or familial), military service, and humanitarian or religious service. Supporting documentation of the reasons for the deferment must be provided with the application for deferment.
      4. An admission deferment may be granted for a maximum period of seven consecutive semesters (including summers). In granting a deferment, the Office of Admissions will determine the appropriate period, and may impose other appropriate conditions and limitations described in the notice of deferment. The admission deferment guarantees admission into the University at or before the conclusion of the deferment period.
      5. Granting of deferment for admission to the University does not guarantee deferred admission to a particular major, minor, certificate or other structured course of study. Additional arrangements for deferment may be considered by the department administering such a particular major or course of study. (See Section III-K.)
      6. Enrollment at an accredited (or recognized non-U.S.) institution during the deferment period.
        1. If an applicant, who has been granted deferment pursuant to this Section III-H, wishes to enroll for any credit-bearing course at another accredited (or recognized non U.S.) institution during the period of deferment and maintain their deferred status at the University, the applicant must:
          1. Obtain prior approval by the Office of Admissions before enrolling in such other institution;
          2. Remain in good academic standing at all such institutions attended during the deferment period; and
          3. At the conclusion of the deferment period, submit to the Office of Admissions official transcripts from all such institutions attended during the deferment period, and such other documentation as the Office may determine necessary to confirm that the applicant has met the above requirement of good academic standing.
        2. The University will evaluate credits earned at such other institution, to determine whether such credits may be transferable to the University, consistent with Section III-E above.
      7. An applicant approved for deferment will be required to attend a mandatory new student orientation session preceding enrollment at the University.
      8. The University may revoke admitted status of (a) an applicant who is not granted a deferment and fails to register for courses within the required time period and thereby becomes ineligible to register for subsequent semesters (per Section III-B-7), or (b) an applicant who is granted deferment but fails to comply with the conditions and limitations imposed in the notice of deferment. Any such applicant whose admitted status has been revoked and who subsequently wishes to gain admission to the University will be required to apply for admission through the normal procedures provided for under this Policy, including payment of all applicable fees, and satisfaction of all admissions criteria applicable at the time admission is sought.
      9. This Policy is not intended to directly govern the effects that a deferment might have on an applicant's eligibility for any form of student financial aid, whether or not administered by the University. An applicant for deferment who anticipates seeking or receiving any form of financial aid should review the terms of the offer of financial aid and consult with appropriate advisors.
    8. Leave of Absence
      1. Degree-seeking undergraduate students who are in good academic standing (as defined in Section II) and who have established a University transcript by registering for and completing University credit courses may apply for a leave of absence.
      2. Applicants for a leave of absence must submit an approved application form to the Office of the Registrar.
      3. Applications for a leave of absence will be reviewed by the Office of the Registrar on a case-by-case basis and may be granted for reasons including, but not limited to, illness (personal or familial), military service, humanitarian or religious service, or participation in a University of Utah sponsored program. Supporting documentation of the reasons for the leave must be provided with the application for leave.
      4. A leave of absence may be granted for a maximum period of seven consecutive semesters (including summers). In granting a leave, the Office of the Registrar will determine the appropriate period, and may impose other appropriate conditions and limitations described in the notice of approval of the leave. A student who is granted a leave of absence and (a) fails to register for courses within the required time period or (b) fails to comply with the conditions and limitations described in the notice of approval will become ineligible to register for subsequent semesters and will be required to apply for readmission to the University (as described in Section III-F).
      5. An approved leave of absence guarantees a right to future enrollment at the University at or before the conclusion of the leave period. However, granting of such a leave from the University does not guarantee a right of enrollment into a particular major, minor, certificate, or other structured course of study. Additional arrangements for a leave may be offered by departments administering such a particular major or program of study.
      6. International students who intend to take a vacation semester must obtain permission from the International Center prior to submitting a leave of absence form to the Office of the Registrar. A leave of absence for international students will only be approved for one semester.
      7. This Policy is not intended to directly govern the effects that a leave of absence might have on a leave-taking student's eligibility for any form of student financial aid, whether or not administered by the University. An applicant for leave who anticipates seeking or receiving any form of financial aid should review the terms of the offer of financial aid and consult with appropriate advisors.
      8. Effect of unauthorized leave. Any degree-seeking undergraduate student who for three consecutive semesters does not enroll in any University course, without having previously been granted a leave of absence under this Section III-F (whether or not such leave was applied for), will be considered by the University to have taken an unauthorized leave of absence. Such student will thereby become ineligible to register for courses in subsequent semesters. If such a student wishes to subsequently return to the University, the student will be required to apply for readmission to the University (as described in Section III-F).
        This provision is not intended to govern cases of students who were placed on suspension or dismissed for misconduct or academic non-performance (as defined in Section II) and thereby prohibited by the University from registering during such a three-semester or greater period, as governed by Policies 6-100-III-K or 6-400. Readmission for such students is described in Section III-F above. This provision does govern in cases in which a student was merely placed on warning or probation for misconduct or academic non-performance, with continuing eligibility to register (per Policies 6-100-III-K or 6-400), and then chose not to register for a three-semester period. Such a student will thereafter be ineligible to register, and if the student wishes to return, must apply for readmission under III-F.
    9. Academic Advising Center As more fully described in Policy 6-101, all undergraduate students admitted to the University will be initially enrolled in Academic Advising Center until they declare a major or are accepted into a specific degree-granting college or department of the University.
    10. College, Department, and Program Admission Criteria Admission (or readmission) to the University as a freshman or transfer student, or for seeking an additional degree, pursuant to Sections III-D to III-G above, is not to be construed as assuring acceptance into a specific major, minor, certificate or other structured course of study offered within the University. Pursuant to Policy 6-101-III, departments or other academic units within the University which administer such majors, minors, certificates or other structured courses of study may establish for them special admission criteria and standards in addition to the existing general requirements for admission and/or maintenance of good standing for the University at large. When such special criteria and standards have been established, they are published in the manner described in Policy 6-101. Applicants for University admission who are also interested in admission to any such specific course of study should consult those published descriptions of special criteria and standards.
    11. Non-Matriculating Applicants Applicants interested in taking credit-bearing courses at the University but who do not wish to pursue a degree or apply for formal matriculation may be admitted as a non-matriculated student.
      1. Summer-only non-matriculated status is available for students who are enrolled at another accredited institution who want to take credit-bearing courses at the University with credit transferable to their home institution. To be eligible, applicants for summer-only status must: a. Have completed at least one term at their home institution and be in good academic standing (as defined in Section II above) at that institution; b. Submit a transcript from their current home institution; and c. Submit a completed application and applicable fees to the Office of Admissions by the appropriate deadline. (See Section III-B-2)
      2. All other non-matriculating applicants must:
        1. Have (i) graduated from high school three or more years prior to the registration term or, (ii) be accepted into a University-sponsored certificate program;
        2. Be in good academic standing (as defined in Section II above) at the most recently attended accredited (or recognized non-U.S.) institution;
        3. Submit an official transcript from the most recently attended accredited (or recognized non-U.S.) institution; and
        4. Submit a completed application form and applicable fees to the Office of Admissions by the established deadline. (See Section III-B-2)
    12. High School University Program (Dual Enrollment)
      1. Purpose. The High School University Program (HSUP) is a dual enrollment program offered by the University for high school sophomores through seniors who want to take advanced courses not available in their high school.
      2. Eligibility and application process. An applicant for the HSUP Dual Enrollment must:
        1. Successfully complete ninth grade;
        2. Be enrolled in a Utah high school (or home-schooled);
        3. Meet the minimum GPA requirement developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above);
        4. Submit the HSUP application and applicable fees by the established deadline (determined by the Office of Admissions);
        5. If a home schooled student, also provide a list of high school level courses completed and meet the minimum ACT or SAT score requirement developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above); and
        6. If an international student attending a Utah high school on a visa that permits university enrollment, also document English language proficiency with the requisite score on an approved test or meet one of the exceptions approved by the Credits and Admissions Committee. The approved English language proficiency tests and the minimum required test scores are developed by the Credits and Admissions Committee (as described in Section III-A-3 above).
      3. Restricted admission. HSUP Dual Enrollment students are ordinarily restricted to enrollment in lower-division (i.e., 1000- or 2000-level) courses. Registration for any course above that level must be pre-approved by the appropriate University entity (i.e., the department or other course-offering unit responsible for the course).

      1. Note: Parts IV-VII of this Regulation (and all other University Regulations) are Regulations Resource Information - the contents of which are not approved by the Academic Senate or Board of Trustees, and are to be updated from time to time as determined appropriate by the cognizant Policy Officer and the Institutional Policy Committee, as per Policy 1-001 and Rule 1-001.
  4. Rules, Procedures, Guidelines, Forms and other related resources.
    1. Rules
    2. Procedures
    3. Guidelines
    4. Forms and other related resources
  5. References
    1. Utah System of Higher Education R461, Admissions, Access and Articulations
  6. Contacts
    1. The designated contact officials for this Policy are:
      1. Policy Owners(primary contact person for questions and advice): Vice President for Student Affairs
      2. Policy Officers: Sr. Vice President for Academic Affairs and \Sr. Vice President for Health Sciences
        1. These officials are designated by the University President or delegee, with assistance of the Institutional Policy Committee, to have the following roles and authority, as provided in University Rule 1-001:
        2. "A 'Policy Officer'" will be assigned by the President for each University Policy, and will typically be someone at the executive level of the University (i.e., the President and his/her Cabinet Officers). The assigned Policy Officer is authorized to allow exceptions to the Policy in appropriate cases.... "
        3. "The Policy Officer will identify an 'Owner' for each Policy. The Policy Owner is an expert on the Policy topic who may respond to questions about, and provide interpretation of the Policy; and will typically be someone reporting to an executive level position (as defined above), but may be any other person to whom the President or a Vice President has delegated such authority for a specified area of University operations. The Owner has primary responsibility for maintaining the relevant portions of the Regulations Library... .[and] bears the responsibility for determining which reference materials are helpful in understanding the meaning and requirements of particular Policies... ." University Rule 1-001-III-B & E
  7. History:
    1. Renumbering: Renumbered as Policy 6-404 effective 9/15/2008, formerly known as PPM 9-6, and formerly as Faculty Regulations Chapter VI.
    2. Revision History:
      1. Current version: Revision 16:
        1. Approved by Academic Senate: February 4, 2013
        2. Approved by Board of Trustees: February 12, 2013
        3. Effective date: February 12, 2013
        4. Legislative History of Revision 16
      2. Earlier versions:
          1. Revision 15: effective dates July 9, 2009 to February 11, 2013
          2. Revision 14:effective dates July 1, 2009 to July 8, 2009
            1. Legislative History of Revision 14
        Revision 13:
          effective dates May 16, 2005 to July 1, 2009
          1. Background information for Revision 13
        1. Revision 12: effective dates October 14, 2002 to May 15, 2005
        2. Revision 11: effective dates March 13, 2000 to October 13, 2002
        3. Revision 10: effective dates December 27, 1999 to March 12, 2000
        4. Revision 9: effective dates October 26, 1999 to December 26, 1999
        5. Revision 8: effective dates July 13, 1998 to October 25, 1999
Last Updated: 6/5/17